What were you thinking?

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autzig
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What were you thinking?

Postby autzig » Sat Nov 01, 2008 9:06 am

So let's start a new topic.

My neighbor is taking a photography mentorship. Along they way, she was asked to submit a group of photos with a description of what she was thinking when she exposed the shot. He thinks that if there is an emotional attachment to the photo, that emotion will be conveyed to the viewer.

Me? I'm thinking about whether I want a fast or slow shutter speed, the depth of field, the composition, how the wind will affect my slow shutter speed shot, whether I want to include the stuff in the foreground or crop it out. I'm looking for that junk in the stream and removing it so it isn't in the photo. I guess I'm a technician, not a purveyor of emotion.

What about you?


abby
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Postby abby » Sun Nov 02, 2008 8:25 pm

I think I'm like you Al. I'm thinking about the best way to get the shot and all of the other things you mentioned. My emotion does come into play sometimes.......when I find an unexpected photo op.......my body has a physical reaction (seriously) My adrenaline starts to pump and I feel happy and excited and blessed to have come across it........sometimes I am so humbled by things I used to take for granted before I got interested in photography. Weather or not my emotions and or reactions show in my photos........I doubt it LOL.........I've never seen it.

Carol

Andy
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Postby Andy » Sun Nov 02, 2008 8:58 pm

For me, it depends on so many things. How much time do I have? Have I scouted this location previously? Is it a "static" nature scene, or a sports/action shot. If its a static nature scene, I do try to do all those things Al mentioned. I hope some of it is second nature (especially, the shutter speed/aperture combination and DOF issues). Sometimes I don't do as good a job looking for the "junk" in the stream, or the branch "merges" as I should. Then, though, I am thinking -- what do I want to "show" the viewer? What is it about this particular scene that "grabs" me, and how can I best portray it to the viewer?

If its an action scene, I am either trying to anticipate where the action will be and be there to capture it, or I am looking for facial expression or eyes.
Andy

If it sounds too good to be true, its probably . . . .

pwt54
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Postby pwt54 » Mon Nov 03, 2008 11:55 am

Up until this last year I've been a point and shot "picture taker". This year I have used the tripod more often. It's a light wieght, packable one. It isn't as stable as a regular tripod, so I use the timer to take the photo. Both of the cameras I have now do have manual setting so I'm practicing more with them. When I get good enough I'll think about a DSLR.

Andy
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Postby Andy » Mon Nov 03, 2008 4:00 pm

A a general rule, the size and stiffness of the tripod is related to the weight of the camera. For your P&S, you don't need a really heavy duty tripod for most applications. A heavier one than necessary will almost always be better than one that is too light, however.
Andy

If it sounds too good to be true, its probably . . . .

abby
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Postby abby » Mon Nov 03, 2008 7:57 pm

pwt54 wrote:Up until this last year I've been a point and shot "picture taker". This year I have used the tripod more often. It's a light wieght, packable one. It isn't as stable as a regular tripod, so I use the timer to take the photo. Both of the cameras I have now do have manual setting so I'm practicing more with them. When I get good enough I'll think about a DSLR.


PWT,
My current tripod is lightweight and I know I'm going to have to replace it when I get a DSLR.

Your comment "when I get good enough I'll think about a DSLR" is exactly the way I've been feeling for the past year. I felt intimidated by a DSLR, and I felt like I just wasn't ready. I learned so much using my current camera, and now I feel confident that the time is right for me to move on. (I actually never thought I'd get to this point but here I am!)
You sound just like me and you will know when the time is right. Some might say to just take the plunge and do it......but I just wasn't comfortable and you have to be comfortable with your equipment or you're not going to either a) use it or b) get good results.

I know my photos are not going to magically improve just because I have a better camera. Actually, I'm expecting them to probably get worse until I get used to it but with practice and patience and probably a million questions (you people are probably going to be running from me........Oh no......she's asking another question :roll: )

Carol

autzig
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Postby autzig » Mon Nov 03, 2008 10:24 pm

Carol, you may be surprised at how little change you will find. The photography is the same, only the equipment is different. You may have to adjust to a tripod if you aren't accustomed to using one.

I find that using a tripod is one of the best parts of photography. I set my camera on a tripod and wait. Sometimes I don't take many exposures because the photo I'm looking for just isn't there. Sometimes, like in this shot, http://www.goldimagesphoto.com/national ... p1003.html I'll take 100 exposures and never move the tripod. I stood at this spot with my cable release in hand and enjoyed the ocean for over an hour. Making exposures of all kinds. Slow shutter speeds, fast shutter speeds, wide open and stopped down apertures. But mostly I just enjoyed the view. Without a tripod, I would have been wondering all over the place shooting here and there with no discipline. Put me behind a tripod mounted camera and I change from a Type A personality to a Type Z. Nowhere am I more relaxed and PATIENT.

abby
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Postby abby » Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:54 pm

Hi Al,
I am usually the opposite of you. I am all over the place when I am shooting photos. Perhaps I should try to be more disciplined, but that's just my style (hey maybe I just found my style I said I didn't have in the other post?:) )

Actually, I am usually shooting photos with either my husband or one of my friends who are not photographers. Therefore I always feel rushed. Sometimes I do go out by myself, but I will only go to open areas alone. I won't walk on trails or off the beaten path unless I am with someone else.

I just replied to your other post that the new tripod will not be coming right away. Hopefully my old tripod will be sturdy enough for the new camera in the meantime.

Thanks again Al and I hope you're having a good week!!
Carol



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