What were you thinking?

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autzig
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Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 12:01 am
Location: Bloomington, MN
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What were you thinking?

Post: # 7996Post autzig
Sat Nov 01, 2008 9:06 am

So let's start a new topic.

My neighbor is taking a photography mentorship. Along they way, she was asked to submit a group of photos with a description of what she was thinking when she exposed the shot. He thinks that if there is an emotional attachment to the photo, that emotion will be conveyed to the viewer.

Me? I'm thinking about whether I want a fast or slow shutter speed, the depth of field, the composition, how the wind will affect my slow shutter speed shot, whether I want to include the stuff in the foreground or crop it out. I'm looking for that junk in the stream and removing it so it isn't in the photo. I guess I'm a technician, not a purveyor of emotion.

What about you?


Andy
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Post: # 8001Post Andy
Sun Nov 02, 2008 8:58 pm

For me, it depends on so many things. How much time do I have? Have I scouted this location previously? Is it a "static" nature scene, or a sports/action shot. If its a static nature scene, I do try to do all those things Al mentioned. I hope some of it is second nature (especially, the shutter speed/aperture combination and DOF issues). Sometimes I don't do as good a job looking for the "junk" in the stream, or the branch "merges" as I should. Then, though, I am thinking -- what do I want to "show" the viewer? What is it about this particular scene that "grabs" me, and how can I best portray it to the viewer?

If its an action scene, I am either trying to anticipate where the action will be and be there to capture it, or I am looking for facial expression or eyes.
Andy

If it sounds too good to be true, its probably . . . .

pwt54
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Post: # 8005Post pwt54
Mon Nov 03, 2008 11:55 am

Up until this last year I've been a point and shot "picture taker". This year I have used the tripod more often. It's a light wieght, packable one. It isn't as stable as a regular tripod, so I use the timer to take the photo. Both of the cameras I have now do have manual setting so I'm practicing more with them. When I get good enough I'll think about a DSLR.

Andy
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Post: # 8007Post Andy
Mon Nov 03, 2008 4:00 pm

A a general rule, the size and stiffness of the tripod is related to the weight of the camera. For your P&S, you don't need a really heavy duty tripod for most applications. A heavier one than necessary will almost always be better than one that is too light, however.
Andy

If it sounds too good to be true, its probably . . . .

autzig
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Post: # 8013Post autzig
Mon Nov 03, 2008 10:24 pm

Carol, you may be surprised at how little change you will find. The photography is the same, only the equipment is different. You may have to adjust to a tripod if you aren't accustomed to using one.

I find that using a tripod is one of the best parts of photography. I set my camera on a tripod and wait. Sometimes I don't take many exposures because the photo I'm looking for just isn't there. Sometimes, like in this shot, http://www.goldimagesphoto.com/national ... p1003.html I'll take 100 exposures and never move the tripod. I stood at this spot with my cable release in hand and enjoyed the ocean for over an hour. Making exposures of all kinds. Slow shutter speeds, fast shutter speeds, wide open and stopped down apertures. But mostly I just enjoyed the view. Without a tripod, I would have been wondering all over the place shooting here and there with no discipline. Put me behind a tripod mounted camera and I change from a Type A personality to a Type Z. Nowhere am I more relaxed and PATIENT.


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