Do You have a Vision?

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Andy
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Do You have a Vision?

Postby Andy » Tue Sep 09, 2008 12:09 pm

I was thinking about Blog topics this morning for my website and came up with this idea -- and thought it would be an interesting topic to hear about from others here, particularly given the rapidly approaching foliage season.

When you photograph, do you have a vision, or an approach? What is the "process" or thinking you go through? How do you approach a subject (not physically, necessarily, but how do you go about showing, framing and photographing it)? Does your approach involve a particular focal length lens (or range)?
Andy

If it sounds too good to be true, its probably . . . .


abby
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Postby abby » Thu Sep 11, 2008 4:43 pm

Hi Andy,
I like to think the way I approach my photography is much more deliberate than it was a year ago. Instead of just pressing the shutter and hoping for a good result, I have been thinking more about the final product, and what it will take to achieve the look I am after. I also have been trying to think about my compositions.....how could I approach the subject from a different angle or point of view to add interest to the photo. I like to experiment with different apertures as well. Last week I was taking some seaside shots of a fishing boat. There were some pink flowers growing along the path I was walking on and I thought they might make look interesting in the forefront. So, I crouched down to the level of the flowers, keeping myself about 8-10 feet away from the flowers, set my aperture wide open, focused on the flowers making sure the fishing boat was still in the frame, and took a few shots. I was really happy with the results I got with the flowers in focus and the fishing boat blurred in the background. A year ago I never would have thought to set up a shot like that.

I'm really looking forward to my upcoming foliage trips. I think my photography skills have improved this past year......I still have a long way to go on the learning curve.........but as I look at my photos from last year compared to the previous year, I see improvements........so I hope to see improvements again this year compared to the last year.

Here's a link that goes along with this topic that is really good for any beginners, and it's also a nice reminder for some more experienced photographers:

http://digital-photography-school.com/b ... questions/

Carol (abby)

pwt54
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Postby pwt54 » Thu Sep 11, 2008 5:48 pm

When I go out with my camera I empty my mind (not difficult for me) and just look around until something catches my attention. Then I look around the subject both near and far and see if there is anything that will enhance the photo. I'm not one to photograph just the object. Then I may take 5 to 10 photos at different settings. I really don't go out with any subject in mind. Well, except for a foliage moose. I've been trying to get a big bull moose to walk under a bright red or orange for years using prays and moose dances but no luck. Any ideas? :?

ctyanky
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Postby ctyanky » Fri Sep 12, 2008 5:32 am

I don't know pwt, have you thought about dressing up in a moose costume and then doing your moose dance? Or maybe stealing Currier's stuffed moose and using that as a decoy right under a bright red or orange? :lol: :lol: :lol:

Andy
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Postby Andy » Fri Sep 12, 2008 7:53 am

10 pretty good tips on that site, Carol. Kind of reminds me of the fundamental rules I learned when I took the NYIP course.

I think your development as a photographer mirrors what a lot of us have done. We start to think of a photograph as a "process" instead of a snapshot. My NYIP instructor who did my critiques made the point early on that we don't "take" photos, we "make" photos.

For my own part, that generally means I need to either photograph alone, or with other photographer-enthusiasts. With others (like my wife and kids), I am likely to get, "didn't you already take that shot?" or "How many photographs do you need of that?" I have a tendency to find a photo and "work" it until I feel I have exhausted it (and not feel near so bad throwing away pixels I don't want to keep, as I did throwing away those slides I had paid to have developed :D ).
Andy

If it sounds too good to be true, its probably . . . .

Andy
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Postby Andy » Fri Sep 12, 2008 7:55 am

I like that thought, Phil. I will have to try to incorporate it next time I am out. I tend to have "visualized" a shot I want to get before I even get on location. Sometimes that is good and planning is always helpful. But I am sure that that mindset also means I miss things that are right there, too.
Andy

If it sounds too good to be true, its probably . . . .



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